Screening Room: 3 - Dan Kapelovitz's TRIPLE FISHER: THE LETHAL LOLITAS OF LONG ISLAND / by Samuel B. Prime

LA Ciné Salon's third installment in the Screening Room series sends it reeling in an altogether different direction. Whereas Ian Clark's MMXIII and Brandon Colvin's FRAMES are both films that burn extra slow in that beautifully avant-garde way to a most thoughtful and thought-provoking cumulative effect, Dan Kapelovitz's TRIPLE FISHER: THE LETHAL LOLITAS OF LONG ISLAND is the gut-busting, feature-length Frankenstein's monster resultant from a mad cinephile's Final Cut tinkering. By splicing together the three made-for-TV movies following the Amy Fisher / Joey Buttafuoco media hubbub of the early nineties, Kapelovitz humorously digests, remixes, and reconstitutes otherwise opportunistic schlock into delightfully self-conscious, post-modern art.

By day, Kapelovitz is a criminal defense lawyer. By night, he is a not-so-starving artist whose performance medium is cultural sieve. Inevitably, his work draws comparisons to Everything is Terrible! and the sort of technologically-forward, culturally-backward work that is the center of RIP: A Remix Manifesto (and in both cases, this is a profoundly good thing). Perhaps rightly or perhaps wrongly, it is my stubborn impression that TRIPLE FISHER was created in some subterranean lair where made-for-TV movies are kept (quite possibly against their will), should the psychotic urge arise to translate / recontextualize them for a far wider audience.

TRIPLE FISHER is three films gloriously smashed together, a kind of 80-minute trilogy sandwich wherein each of its component parts cruelly tells the same story, with both variously slight and glaring differences (presumably due to the source texts / accounts on which each is based - i.e. who got paid). TRIPLE FISHER is one of a kind. 

Kapelovitz's TRIPLE FISHER is available to watch on LA Ciné Salon from now until June 8th, 2014, at 10pm (Pac).

His next project, currently a work-in-progress, is 48 HRS. (LITERALLY) - a 48-hour version of Walter Hill's film.

- Samuel B. Prime

Founder, LA Ciné Salon